Intro to the new project. It’s a working draft.

Three weeks. Three weeks changed everyone’s lives.

There’s no way I could ever explain what happened without the help of the men involved. The time between late July and August 2006 would impact all of us. Being recalled to war after returning home was…was…I don’t quite know. Some fled, others were “grounded” for medical reasons, most of us returned when the time came.

When it was all said and done, we were different. There were those who came home in silver military caskets strapped to the floor of cargo planes.

Those days were the wildest of my life. It was a blur of chaos, violence, sex and alcohol. Some of the memories are fuzzy. I recall some of the highlights. The good and bad. I’m not going to hide from my Each of us involved has a piece of the story locked away in the depths of our mind, waiting to be shared with the world.

This book is dedicated to the dead, wounded and broken soldiers of the 172nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team who spent 16 months of their young lives in a desert warzone.

Intro…

I’m sure there are scores of other combat veterans that have publicly humiliated themselves nationally by going on a syndicated news program[1] ranting about how in a four-day period, they caught the clap,[2] fought a white rapper and his posse, and knocked up a grandmother[3].    By doing this, I’m sure they pissed off their girlfriends and wives, like I did.

What you’re about to read, isn’t the typical war memoir, but a true[4] glimpse at an under achieving and overeducated grunt.  It’s often not pretty.  The language you will come across is coarse and often politically incorrect.    I may paraphrase some conversations and quotes.  The characters that inhabit my story vary.  Sometimes the antagonists aren’t insurgents hell bent on ruining your day, but the people you work for.  I would classify some of the people involved as heroes, others not so much.  I include myself in the latter group.

The story itself moves from comedy to tragedy, with ease.  You may read into the humor and lightheartedness as escapism. The book is more of a comedic take on the military experience, but don’t mistake it for satire.  Beneath the funny aspects lies sadness.   I don’t hate the military at all.  I miss the sense of purpose and camaraderie.  However many times I trash other people and leaders, I bring the same upon myself two-fold.  That’s probably what it truly is and how I deal with reality.  The dark side of wartime service balances the levity.  The good and bad die, get cancer, ruin their lives, are injured, and lose families.  I’m disabled, the Veterans Administration puts my percentile at 60%[5].    I’m mental, it would seem.

Currently, I am sipping a beer, wondering why I haven’t finished the paperwork for the Art Foundation I am forming.

You are about to enter a different type of culture.  I am dedicating this book to my fallen comrades, along with the veterans in my family who have passed.  I am sure if my grandpa had read this, he’d strangle me.  Here’s hoping they have a sense of humor up there.


[1] National Public Radio, “War Vets Try To Bridge The Divide Back Home” by Libby Lewis.  Originally aired on June 18th, 2008.

[2] It’s curable.

[3] A wonderful, caring woman who I hope is doing well.

[4] As I know it.

[5] I’ll get to that later.  As the reader can see, I like footnotes.